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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
took it as a personal question you could almost see interface to redress that she and bob dole have never had a child. she said we'd never have children. it was really just an abstract kind of question. the next day the media said she's not ready for the campaign trail because she's not talking like a kennedy. she's talking to this person away. all of a sudden within three weeks, her campaign had folded. i think michael dukakis problem in terms of presidential debates that he was asked whether he would do, he gave a lawyerly and their, a defense of his opposition to capital punishment. all of a sudden we said this and this guy have a human side of all? it's one of those things we see into the capabilities of the year of the individual. al gore because those he's been pointed out as the serial exaggerator. any one of those stories you could explain away he'd never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create the internet. and then to have the perception of being in a laboratory and doing it. he was support creative creating the arpanet, but he had that story in a story tha
counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to come about to write this book. >> good afternoon. i would like to thank the committee on law and national security for giving me the opportunity to work on this book project. if he told a couple of years ago , i was still at college that soon thereafter are be working gun national security policy book, would have told you were crazy. i have been to a number of committee events in the past and i often hear panelists described that only now we seem national-security will really come into its own separate field and seeing enterprises like welfare in national security loan center will reviews and journals popple ball
during world war ii, where he met phil hart and bob dole. and can you imagine those three great men coming together serving our country, wounded, doing rehabilitation at a hospital together in michigan and all going on to be involved in public service as united states senators. that building is still standing. it is no longer a hospital. it's another federal building. it's our great honor in michigan to have that building named the hart dole inouye federal center honoring all three of these outstanding leaders. senator inouye was a great mentor for me as well as so many of us in the senate. coming to the senate always encouraging me, during the elections always telling me to hang in there and theupbgdz would -- things would go well and it would be great. always the person with the smile on his face encouraging each and every one of us. he was there encouraging me when we were fighting for our economic lives in michigan with the automobile industry saying it was going to be okay, we'd be able to get through it and that things would be better on the other side. and he was right. with
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14